Saturday, October 13, 2007

Everything from tofu to grilled frogs

The market in Mae Sot instantly became my new favorite. It's a sprawling and constantly changing landscape of food, clothes and people. This woman is wearing thanaka, a tree-bark paste traditionally used by the Burmese as both decoration and protection from the sun. She sold me some stuffed fried tofu which, unfortunately, was really greasy.


Just down the street there were curls for your head, and tiaras to go on top of the curls -- perhaps to prevent them from blowing away.


There were mystery meats, and there were some meats that I wished were a little more mysterious, if you know what I mean.


6 comments:

elyani said...

I love froglegs but never tried grilled frogs. In Indonesia my favorite is froglegs cooked in soypaste sauce, deep fried spicy tempura style and froglegs soup in Chinese restaurant called "kodok pi oh" cooked with soypaste and sliced of coriander leaves. Did they marinate the froglegs before grilling them?

michele said...

looks like a very colorful market. did you buy yourself any lime green or hot pink clothes?

mina said...

A horrible sight, those frogs.
anyway, in my village (and even in the deep part of the city in Banjarmasin), for sun-protector, people still use some mix of rice-fluor and some fragrant from jasmine flowers. some even mix special kind of, er, clay, in the paste.

fisto said...

oh my...is that frogs?...kodok panggang?...

kopisusu2 said...

Yep, those would be frogs! I didn't try them, so can't comment on the preparation. I believe I could eat one, particularly if I were at somebody's house and risked giving offense by not eating it ... but I wouldn't go out of my way to try them.

Mina, that's interesting. I didn't know there was a similar tradition in Indonesia. What village are you from?

And no, Michele, I didn't get any clothes, but I did get a nice woven blankety thing that I think we'll put on the wall. It's lavender with some yellow and green.

mina said...

I live in Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan, and the villages I was referring to were located somewhere deeper into the South Kalimantan: in Amuntai, Alabio, Kandangan, Rantau, etc. My grandmother, who lives in Banjarmasin, still uses the paste on daily basis.